Presentation Abstracts

Concurrent Session 1: 10:25-11:10

  • Beyond “Users:” Cultivating Community In and Around Libraries

    Location
    Room 1615
    Speaker(s)
    Patrick Tomlin—Virginia Tech University
    Tag(s)
    Outreach/Collaboration, Profession(al) Development

    This presentation challenges the transactional relationships libraries have utilized in the past and demonstrates how the product of such transactions is secondary to a larger undertaking: forging connections between individuals and institutions. Drawing upon current research in three areas—service design thinking, organizational knowledge, and theories of communities of practice—it explores the potential for creating a community invested in the library as a cultural hub, driven by reciprocal, dynamic relationships between librarians, students, and faculty. It will offer service design strategies for going beyond a transactional model and embracing a view of the library as a proactive partner in learning and creativity; identifies key organizational priorities that can help advance such an endeavor, and includes lessons learned from the recent implementation of learning spaces at Virginia Tech.

  • Client/Provider Relationship: Library as Client & Art Students as Provider

    Location
    Room 1616
    Speaker(s)
    Jenna Rinalducci—University of North Carolina-Charlotte
    Tag(s)
    Academic, Outreach/Collaboration, Spaces

    What started as a discussion about how to bring more art into the library developed into a valuable collaboration with faculty and students to bring murals into the architecture library. The Arts & Architecture Librarian reached out to one of the painting professors to discuss showcasing student work in the branch library, and the result was an elaborate mural project. The librarian worked with two professors teaching a Print Media 3 and a Mixed Media class; intermediate studios exploring conceptual problems using color drawing media, painting, collage, lithographic printmaking techniques, and other alternative and traditional graphic methods. The presentation will cover how the project expanded, how we documented progress, the funding secured, the student’s real-world application of their scholarship, and how the projected created an inviting space to inspire learning.

  • Writers’ Camp @ ZSR: Encouraging the Entrepreneurial Spirit in Young Writers

    Location
    Room 1617
    Speaker(s)
    Hu Womack—Wake Forest University
    Tag(s)
    Academic, Public, Outreach/Collaboration

    The Outreach Librarians in the Z. Smith Reynolds Library at Wake Forest University expanded both our outreach offerings and our collaborations across campus with a new event, Writers’ Camp @ ZSR. Selected from a group of applicants, 25 talented Wake Forest University students, participated in a 12 hour writing challenge that encompassed all phases from writing and revising to preparing for publication. By morning, they jointly created a cataloged volume available in Kindle ebook or print on demand formats from Amazon. Join us as we discuss how librarians and student authors make logical partners for these types of events and learn the best practice we’ve discovered from publishing these volumes.

  • Designing Better Partnerships for Student Success

    Location
    Room 4903
    Speaker(s)
    David Woodbury—North Carolina State University & Joan Ruelle—Elon University
    Tag(s)
    Academic, Outreach/Collaboration, Spaces

    Librarians from two different libraries (NCSU and Elon) will share their experiences with planning to incorporate new academic success partners in library spaces. As more libraries move (or are forced) towards bringing other campus units into library spaces, we will offer our lessons learned about planning, logistics, and trends along with strategies to help library staff build successful partnerships with their new housemates. Elon’s Belk Library brought academic advising and the office of disabilities resources into renovated and expanded library spaces. The NCSU Libraries and the NCSU Division of Academic and Student Affairs are partnering to create an Academic Success Center in the D. H. Hill Library opening in Fall 2020. Hear how each library partnered deeply to build successful collaborative working models, identified shared goals and managed different departmental cultures.

Concurrent Session 2: 11:20-12:05

  • An Entrepreneurial Approach to Helping Entrepreneurs

    Location
    Room 1615
    Speaker(s)
    Vicki Johnson, Kassie Ettefagh, & John Raynor—High Point Public Library
    Tag(s)
    Public, Outreach/Collaboration, Spaces

    The High Point Public Library was tasked with finding a way to help support the city’s strategic plan to increase population, create new housing and employment, and create a vibrant downtown. Focusing efforts on entrepreneurs, job-seekers, and current small-business owners, HPPL designed a plan to provide personalized research sessions, one-on-one training with databases, social media usage advice, and space for job-related programming. Three Business Librarians work with Chamber of Commerce, small business expos, city council, and more. By changing its methods of providing information and trying to be more proactive, HPPL has evolved to better serve entrepreneurs, job-seekers and small-business owners.

  • Cultivating Connections: Growing Internationalization in Your University

    Location
    Room 1616
    Speaker(s)
    Allison Sharp, M. Nathalie Hristov, & Manda Sexton—University of Tennessee, Knoxville
    Tag(s)
    Academic, Outreach/Collaboration

    As universities seek to bring their institutions to a new global age by offering multicultural and multinational perspectives to their course and program offerings, academic libraries should seize the unique opportunity to lead. Our panel will expound upon the role of the academic library in the international campus community to become a vital way to reach diverse student populations, assisting in both library perceptions and international student retention. Innovative ideas and creative solutions to engagement will be presented leading to lifelong relationships with faculty, students, friends, and scholars. Specific strategies for successful partnerships and programs will be examined. Attendees will experience a multimedia sampling of our offerings, and practical materials to guide them through their own outreach efforts.

  • Entrepreneurial Librarians and the Knowledge Economy: A look at Entrepreneurial Relationship Development (ERD) Perspective

    Location
    Room 1617
    Speaker(s)
    Alexis Rittenberger & Shola Ajiboye—Case Western University
    Tag(s)
    Profession(al) Development, Outreach/Collaboration, Research

    The American Library Association identifies the continuing transformation of libraries as a key priority. This transformation will allow libraries to keep pace with, or ahead of evolving knowledge economy and socio-cultural change. Drawing from the entrepreneurial relationship development’s (ERD) elements of entrepreneurship such as: partnership, opportunities, resources, structure and performance, this presentation will examine the ERD perspective as a capability to enhance the transformational work of entrepreneurial librarians. It will link the elements of information behavior and interactive practice as antecedents of entrepreneurial librarians’ actions for better service outcomes. Acquisition of ERD capability leads to better outcomes and improved community impact through stronger relationships with key partners, including institutional and community collaborators, policy makers and patrons, community advocates, volunteers and mentors.

  • Two brief sessions

    Reaching Campus and Community with Entrepreneurship Research Workshops

    Location
    Room 4903
    Speaker(s)
    Meghann Kuhlmann & Sara Butts—Wichita State University
    Tag(s)
    Academic, Outreach/collaboration, Profession(al) Development

    Wichita State University (WSU) has positioned itself as an “innovation university” with strong emphasis on invention, small business incubation, and economic development across the region. WSU Libraries launched the Entrepreneurship Research Series (ERS) of workshops in Fall 2016. Each semester since then we have offered 6-11 workshops on intellectual property and market research topics relevant to inventors and prospective business owners. Workshops are open to students and the community. Successful outreach, with marketing beyond our traditional patron base, has led to increasing our visibility as a Patent and Trademark Resource Center (PTRC) and partner in innovation support and promoting use of our business and intellectual property resources. We’ll discuss the opportunities and challenges of creating an entrepreneurship education initiative aimed at both campus and community members including alignment of the library initiative to university goals, community outreach, partnership creation, and managing multiple priorities in an academic setting.

    How to Never Underestimate Librarians as New Commercialization Partners

    Speaker(s)
    Yvonne Dooley & Steven Tudor—University of North Texas
    Tag(s)
    Academic, Outreach/collaboration, Profession(al) Development

    As higher education evolves and re-imagines information exchange with industry, an increasing number of universities are creating and expanding Technology Transfer Offices (TTO) to commercialize faculty created intellectual property. This exchange fosters technology-based economic development and entrepreneurial success. Conference attendees will learn about the successful alliance between UNT Libraries and the Office of Innovation and Commercialization, where the library moved outside its normal sphere to help create a patent internship program. Presenters will explain how this collaborative partnership works and provides win-win situations for all parties involved. Attendees will also learn new ways librarians can advance innovative community initiatives, position themselves as trusted partners, and create professional experiences to prepare students for valuable career opportunities.

Concurrent Session 3: 1:55 – 2:40

  • Grow, Evolve, Lead! Seed Libraries for Social and Environmental Change

    Location
    Room 1615
    Speaker(s)
    Holly Dean—University of Tennessee Knoxville
    Tag(s)
    Outreach/Collaboration, Resources/Collections

    Seed Libraries have the power to facilitate social and environmental change through community engagement and cross-disciplinary conversations. They provide opportunities for personal growth among students, faculty, and administrators; for academic institutions and libraries to evolve and meet the needs of our changing climate; and enable us all to serve our communities in unexpected ways. Assistant Professor and Experiential Learning Librarian, Holly Dean, will share the potential for seed libraries in higher education to break down barriers across academic departments, creating opportunities for new partnerships, community outreach, food access, and experiential learning. Come learn how libraries can expand their mission through seed libraries, and continue to grow, evolve, and lead their communities in unexpected ways.

  • A Library’s Deep Dive into the Residential Campus: Creating a Library Living Learning Community

    Location
    Room 1616
    Speaker(s)
    Patrick Rudd & Joan Ruelle—Elon University
    Tag(s)
    Academic, Outreach/Collaboration

    Elon University has invested heavily in the academic and social benefits of a residential campus through Living Learning Communities (LLC). Elon’s Belk Library created Library LLC for first-year students who love books, information, research, and scholarship, inviting them to participate more deeply in Belk Library, the academic heart of the residential campus. LLC students have the opportunity to develop research skills, build their academic toolkit, and foster strong relationships as they transition to college. This leap into residence life exemplifies a new opportunity for libraries to deepen involvement with intellectual and social life on campus. Hear our story of developing a Library LLC and our hopes for meaningful engagement with first-year students.

  • Librarians as Project Managers and the Internal Service of Library Project Management

    Location
    Room 1617
    Speaker(s)
    Rebecca Miksch—North Carolina State University
    Tag(s)
    Academic, Profession(al) Development

    This presentation will address the creation of a new role at NCSU Libraries – IT Initiatives Librarian, i.e. project manager – and how, through this role, NCSU Libraries has been developing project management as a new internal proficiency and practice across all departments. It will examine: value of project management training to provide consistent practice; creation of project management teams to monitor progress, cost, effort, etc; prioritizing projects to ensure alignment with strategic goals, importance of project management when working across departments; and more. Attendees will learn the benefits of project management and how to make the case for and implement it, and can share their own experiences with projects and project management at their institution.

  • Two brief sessions

    The ROI of ROI Outreach

    Location
    Room 4903
    Speaker(s)
    Amy Harris-Houk & Maggie Murphy—University of North Carolina-Greensboro
    Tag(s)
    Academic, Public, Outreach/Collaboration, Resources/Collections

    Liaison librarians in the Reference, Outreach, and Instruction (ROI) department of UNC Greensboro’s University Libraries have collaborated on educational programming with regional high schools, the local chapter of the American Association of University Women, a nearby retirement community, and a grassroots political advocacy group in Greensboro. Through these collaborations, our information literacy programs have reached a range of audiences, from middle-schoolers to retirees. However, while these opportunities have raised the library’s profile in the community, they are not without downsides. This session will discuss our collaborations, how these partnerships began, the lessons we have learned, and balancing the time commitment associated with community outreach with other duties to maximize return on investment.

    Growing and Evolving Education: Librarians Developing and Implementing Community Health Literacy Workshops

    Speaker(s)
    Samantha Harlow & Lea Leininger—University of North Carolina-Greensboro Health Science
    Tag(s)
    Academic, Public, Outreach/Collaboration, Resources/Collections

    In order to align with the University Libraries strategic plan to increase both general information literacy and health literacy efforts in the community, UNCG Health Science librarians developed a series of workshops on “Finding Health Information on the Internet.” In these workshops, librarians covered website evaluation, database recommendation, search strategies, and created a LibGuide for community members interested in finding health information.This presentation will cover outreach and marketing strategies when reaching out to community partners (such as churches, local hospitals, and university staff); successes and failures of presenting to community patrons; future plans for health literacy workshop expansion; and ways to further engage your community in information literacy workshops and conversations.

Concurrent Session 4: 2:50-3:45

  • Retiring in 2055: Evolution and Education a Long Library Career

    Location
    Room 1615
    Speaker(s)
    Ash Faulkner—Ohio State University Libraries
    Tag(s)
    Profession(al) Development

    As a librarian at the beginning of her career, the presenter has devoted considerable time to considering the future of libraries and librarianship. In this presentation she will discuss her views on the evolving roles of librarians and how she has prepared for these changing needs. Discussion will include the utility of basic business knowledge (gleaned from an MBA), the importance of understanding data and the growing need to understand statistical analysis and software, how to utilize professional organizations and personal networks to address learning gaps, and best bet resources for individual learning pursuits. The presenter will discuss her views of current and future librarianship, as well as those found in the literature and through conversations with other early-career librarians.

  • Enterprising Liaisons: Evolving Engagement

    Location
    Room 1616
    Speaker(s)
    Jennifer Natale—Appalachian State University
    Tag(s)
    Academic, Outreach/Collaboration

    Liaisons have responsibility for multiple academic departments and/or student populations and are pulled in too many directions in the middle of the semester, leaving themselves unable to accomplish all the liaison activities. Enterprising librarians can stay ahead of the curve by building a profile of the academic departments or student populations they serve and developing an engagement plan for the year. In this workshop I will outline key concepts within a profile identifying ways liaisons can intersect with their departments or student populations. The profiles will then provide the foundation for generating an annual engagement plan and allow you to balance your workload throughout the year. Engagement plans, and some technology tools, can be implemented in part or in whole and as an individual or liaison team.

  • “The Future is Already Here”: Intern Training for Next-Generation Academic Librarians

    Location
    Room 1617
    Speaker(s)
    Jenny Dale & Maggie Murphy—University of North Carolina-Greensboro
    Tag(s)
    Academic, Profession(al) Development, Outreach/Collaboration

    The Research, Outreach, and Instruction intern training program at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro strives to prepare interns for more than just staffing the desk. This program has evolved over time to take a holistic approach to training future library professionals, focusing not only on the skills and knowledge necessary to staff our desk but also on developing broader communication, problem-solving, and teaching skills crucial for our field. The training program allows interns to get hands-on experience with disciplinary resources and research strategies, instructional design, outreach material creation, and classroom “micro-teaching.” Hear from the information literacy program coordinator and interns who will reflect on how their experiences have impacted their professional growth, confidence, and identities as future librarians.

  • Two brief sessions

    Content Liberation!: How Increasing the Institutional Repository Content Turned into Faculty Outreach Services

    Location
    Room 4903
    Speaker(s)
    Jennifer Solomon & Rebekah Kati—University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
    Tag(s)
    Academic, Outreach/Collaboration, Resources/Collections

    In January 2016, the UNC-Chapel Hill faculty adopted the Open Access policy, encouraging faculty to deposit their articles into the Carolina Digital Repository (CDR). The UNC Libraries Open Access Implementation team was then charged with increasing the amount of content in the CDR and raising faculty awareness of the UNC Open Access Policy and author rights issues. In this presentation, we will discuss the challenges of locating and harvesting content, the outreach strategies we used with faculty from diverse departments, and the assessment of the overall project’s success. We will also share findings from our analysis of the content we collected and recommendations for replicating or scaling up similar projects.

    Capturing Gray Literature for the Institutional Repository

    Speaker(s)
    Lee Richardson & Barbara Rochen Renner—University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
    Tag(s)
    Academic, Outreach/Collaboration, Resources/Collections

    This presentation reports on several projects to deposit gray literature from health affairs schools at a large academic research institution into the institutional repository (IR). This important scholarship, produced by students, faculty and staff, may not be continued or disseminated in other ways. Therefore, capturing and preserving these materials in the IR ensures they will always be available. While each work is valuable on its own, collecting them together also provides researchers, faculty, prospective students and alumni the opportunity to examine this output as collections and in the context of other scholarly work from the university. Deposit workflows and challenges related to educating users about the IR, dealing with copyright issues and getting deposit agreements and materials will be discussed.